How to Help a Child With ADHD That Complains of Boredom

Complaining of boredom once in a while is part of being a kid. But for children with ADHD, this can be a frequent problem, and it can manifest in negative ways.

In this new article, we show how to help them deal with this state. Keep reading!

Boredom and ADHD

Children with ADHD are always ready for new and exciting things. They seek stimulation all the time, but this is not a personality trait. A growing number of research studies suggest that this may be due to the structure and chemical composition of their brains.

Let’s imagine a typical class where children are learning about some topics. Many of them may find the class a bit boring, but they know they need to learn and can consciously decide to sit still and pay attention.

Children with ADHD, on the other hand, do not have this kind of control. This may be because the parts of their brains responsible for paying attention, concentrating, and staying motivated are below the “level of excitability” needed to get them going. These parts don’t work as efficiently as their peers’.

But there is another factor that plays in ADHD and boredom. Children with this deficit usually have problems with their executive function, or the brain’s control system.

Often, they are full of good ideas and imagine many things they want to do. But most of the time, they lack the planning, organizing, and problem-solving skills to carry them out.

What to do when your child complains of boredom

During the development of children with ADHD, parents must teach them things progressively and naturally to encourage their creativity and ability to play. Here are some tips:

  • Teach the little ones there are other ways to have fun apart from playing with toys, board games, and electronic devices. Motivate them to read and exercise their minds.
  • Provide them the tools to learn, always according to their age and condition.
  • Spend time together. Take some time from your daily responsibilities to play with your child and share some family moments.

Children with ADHD need to feel constantly stimulated, so we have to offer them spaces for creation and opportunities to practice their abilities. Free, imaginative, and unstructured play is essential for every child’s development.

Source: https://bit.ly/2RO7qHG

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Children With Autism: Habits for a Good Sleep

Children within the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more vulnerable to sleep disturbances. According to research, 44 to 83% of people with autism have sleep-related problems. These disorders adversely affect the behavior and emotional well-being of the child and the family by increasing the frequency of temper tantrums, irritability, and stress.

That is why it is important to help children learn and maintain good sleep habits. Here we offer you some advice on how to accomplish this.

 

Problematic sleep habits

 

Regular sleep cycles are influenced by daily routines, and children with ASD sometimes have trouble understanding and following them. Sometimes, they might get attached to unusual sleep habits and have trouble fitting into the regular family routine.

So the first thing you need to do is working on your child’s understanding of routines in general.

 

Bedtime routines for children within the autism spectrum disorder

 

  • Use a schedule and visual aids showing the bedtime routine, so your child can understand every step.
  • Praise your child for understanding and completing each step.
  • Put a sticker on the schedule every time your child completes a step correctly. This can help children see the situation as a game and will motivate them to follow the routine.

 

Appropriate bedtimes for children with ASD

 

Having an appropriate bedtime is essential for establishing a good routine. But, as we all know, children may have some trouble adapting to it, and it can be even harder for those within the spectrum. Here are a couple of things you can do to help them adopt good sleep habits:

  • It is convenient to create a short and simple bedtime routine. Structured activities help children with autism calm down, anticipate what is going to happen next, and think about what they need to do. So, we should create a simple routine consisting of 4 or 5 steps that need to be carried out before going to bed. Something like this, for example:

1-. Brush your teeth.

2-. Drink water.

3-. Read a story in bed.

4-. Turn off the light.

5-. Go to sleep.

  • Avoid highly stimulating activities at least two hours before bedtime. Limit things like watching TV or playing videogames, and try to propose relaxing activities, such as reading, listening to classical music, and taking a hot bath.
  • Adapt the stimulating conditions to the child’s needs. Some children with autism are extremely sensitive to things like light, sound, and touch. This hypersensitivity can interfere with their sleep, so we must regulate the light entering their room and avoid making loud noises.

It is all about finding the right information and tools to learn what to do. Remember, you must be patient and understanding throughout this whole process, adopting new habits can be a difficult task for your child.

Source: https://raisingchildren.net.au/autism/health-daily-care/sleep/sleep-for-children-with-asd

A good sleep and rest can do wonderful things for a child with autism.

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Teens With Autism: The Transition to Adulthood

Becoming an adult is a big step for teens with autism or special needs, so their transition to adulthood needs careful planning.

If your children present additional needs, helping them through their development is essential. Early planning will give you plenty of time to work on the skills they need to reach their goals for adulthood. It will also give you time to figure out how to support them when they need it.

Design a plan for their transition to adulthood

Teenagers have to be ready for their transition to adult life. To help them, you must take into account several factors, such as:

  • Their short, medium, and long-term goals for the future.
  • Their strengths, interests, and weaknesses.
  • Their current skills and abilities. Knowing them can help you decide what other skills to teach them and which ones should be improved with practice.
  • Your needs and how to balance them with theirs.

Talking with teachers, support staff, therapists, siblings, relatives, and friends is ideal to complement this plan.

Every teen’s transition plan should be different and tailored to their needs, but you should also consider these areas:

  • Education.
  • Work.
  • Developing an autonomous life.
  • Social interaction and community participation.

How to prepare them for transition periods

  • Let teens play an active role in their health care. It is important to explain their condition to them at a young age.
  • Make sure they can explain their condition to others. As they grow, teach them specific self-care routines, such as pain management, proper rest, and nutrition. Help them develop a relationship with their physician and encourage them to ask questions and participate in the appointments.
  • Consider their interests when seeking training and vocational programs.
  • Be a good role model. Remember that you, and other family members, are your child’s most important teachers.

Each one of our tips should be applied according to the condition of every teen. At this stage, we also recommend seeking the help of professionals, who will be able to tell you what to do and how, and will be by your side throughout the process.

Let’s remember that we must be patient, try to understand them, and inform ourselves about the way they see the world. Going into adulthood may not be easy for them, but with our help and support, it can be more bearable.

Source: http://bit.ly/38x9knw

Help your teen with autism become an adult.

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Back to School: How to Help Your Child with Their New School Year

The school is an environment that encourages and helps the development and social adaptability of our children, but it can turn out to be a tense environment, with excess stimuli and provoking disruptive behaviors if we don’t pay attention to specific details. Parents of children with autism need to take into account general issues when preparing the children to go back to school. It’s not just about taking them and leaving them there, it’s about taking them to a place where they will be happy, and they will learn.

Tips for back to school

Communication with the teaching team (principals and teachers) is essential for a proper school experience process. Before returning to school, it’s advisable to have a meeting with your teachers and the school guidance team (pedagogical team).

It’s important to know the general project and the type of activities that we’ll have for our child; whether it’s inclusion or integration. There may also be plans to work individually and in a different environment of your classroom on some specific topics.

If the professionals involved in your child’s treatment have written instructions to apply in the school context, you should immediately inform the school. Thus the general project of the school year is modified according to the particular needs that arise.

In the meeting you make with the pedagogical team, it’s recommended that you comment on the needs or other relevant subjects that are necessary to share, such as:

  • What does the child like.
  • What subjects attract the attention and which ones don’t.
  • How to maintain or recover the child’s attention.
  • What situations can disorganize the child behaviorally, and how to recover it.
  • What can he eat and what can not.
  • Associated health problems.
  • Expose the areas of strength and areas that require support. A summary of the previous school year is very valuable.

Prepare the child

The school and teachers need to prepare to receive the child with autism, regardless of their adaptive level and academic performance. But it’s also necessary to prepare our child for the return to school, for this it’s advisable to take into account some things:

  • Have conversations with him about the school.
  • Visit previously the school where the child is going to study.
  • Make social stories about returning to school, with graphic media, toys or simulations of school activities.
  • The holidays are always out of control of the sleep schedule, so to begin to establish a schedule to sleep and wake up is fundamental.

The return to school is an activity that we must prepare with a special dedication.

Our child must be happy and safe at school.

Learning what makes your child happy in the academic sense is fundamental to help them reach their success in their school year.

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Feeling of Failure in Autism

The environment, in general, can be very hostile towards people within the autism spectrum disorder; either by sensory saturation, by incomprehension of what’s happening, by zero empathy on the part of others towards him or her. We’re talking about an environment that makes it difficult daily, and as a result, we see that those pleasant moments are scarce.

But we must not forget that the person can develop a sustained sense of failure, an aspect that often begins in childhood. When a child with problems managing his own emotions and frustration presents explosive behaviors, he receives, in many cases, a correction of inappropriate behavior. That is, in the face of frustration at not being able to do something, he gets an attitude that he perceives as correct.

Autism and failure

This feeling of failure accompanies low self-esteem. A problem that, although many believe it wakes up in adolescence, we can begin to observe it in childhood. And there’s nothing sadder than seeing 5-year-olds with low self-esteem, although it’s sadder to see that nobody notices.

This can difficult the social life of the person with autism, and generate not only anxiety, frustration, and irritability, but also a sensation of failure. This can lead the person with autism to never assume new challenges in the future; creating a depressing feeling, which must be identified and stopped as soon as possible.

Working the self-determination and independence of the person is fundamental. It’s very important that we have as one of our objectives to promote independence, always create the necessary supports, and make sure that the person understands the process so he can succeed. The emotional reinforcer, always suitable to the age and environment of the person with autism, must be present in every step of the process.

Promoting independence and self-determination will strengthen the emotional state, the person must understand that things don’t always come out the first time.

The states of anxiety in people with autism are present since childhood. Understanding this is essential to develop educational and intervention programs in autism.

A program of emotional reinforcement is indicated for these situations.

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