Children and Teens With Autism: Why Social Events and Parties Are Hard for Them

Socializing and going to parties help children with autism spectrum disorder improve their social and communication skills. However, most social events can be tough to handle for them. The best way to help your children progressively develop their social skills is by planning everything with time.

Reasons why holiday events can be difficult for children with ASD

  • Children with autism have problems with communication and social interaction
  • They find it difficult to wait, organize, or solve unexpected situations
  • They are easily overwhelmed by their surroundings
  • They are disturbed by noise, screams, and loud music

That said, if we apply the right strategy, parties and meetings can be a great opportunity for them to develop their communication and social skills.

Planning social events with your child within the spectrum

Taking your child with ASD to a social event is not mandatory. Do what you consider convenient and what you can both handle. Plan every detail to help your kid feel comfortable and confident.

Strategies to prepare children for the event

  • Tell them a story about a party. Focus the story on a specific theme, for example, respect for turns, or how to behave when someone wins a game
  • Exchange roles with your child. For example, represent a scene about how to greet others, how to get to the place, etc
  • Show them videos of parties. There are plenty of videos on YouTube showing common behaviors at social events. This is called video modeling
  • Plan the supervision of your child with your partner or ask a trusted family member to help you
  • Make an emergency plan if the child starts feeling overwhelmed. You can take him/her for a walk or accompany him to a quiet place
  • Take a “support kit” that contains all his/her favorite toys, books, and food in case of a crisis.

Development of skills to help your child with autism manage social events

Over time, children with ASD can learn many skills, such as:

  • Teamwork
  • Respecting others’ turn
  • Sharing
  • Being patient and calm
  • Accepting losing a game

These will help them enjoy the holidays and learn how to interact in all kinds of social events and even at school.

How can you help them develop these skills?

There are many ways to help children with autism improve their social skills:

  • Tell them stories about social events. This strategy will show them how to behave and what to expect at parties
  • Practice losing in different games. This way, you can teach them there is nothing wrong with losing sometimes
  • Teach them to say “good job, you win” and “congratulations”

Tips for organizing a party for children with ASD

  • Plan the event with a clear and precise structure
  • Use a decoration with something your child likes or based on his/her special interests
  • Try to avoid unstructured games
  • Avoid anything that could distress your child. For example, don’t play loud music at the party if it bothers him/her
  • Ask other family members for help if he/she gets angry or has a crisis
  • Make sure adults attending the event know what to do to help your child in case of an uncomfortable situation

Having children with ASD doesn’t necessarily mean that your social life and theirs is over. On the contrary, if you prepare the parties or reunions with enough time, these events can be very useful to improve their social skills and teach them how to appropriately relate to others.

 

family gathering

Help your child or teen with autism to face the social events and parties of the holidays.

Source: http://bit.ly/2Y525yr

 

Facebook: Autism Soccer

Instagram: Autism Soccer

Twitter: Autism Soccer

Autismsoccer.org

Major Angel Sponsor

Boys with Autism: Take Care of Your Body!

Puberty brings many physical and psychological changes that are difficult to handle, especially for teens with autism. Our responsibility as parents is to teach our children how to take care of their bodies during this stage. Here we show you the best way to educate your child with autism in all aspects related to the care and hygiene of the body.

The first thing you have to explain to an adolescent within the spectrum is why he needs to take care of his body. It is important to use a simple language according to his age and level of autism, so he can understand the changes he will experience as he grows and develops.

Let him know that as we age, our bodies change until we become adults. This transition from boy to man is what we call puberty. When it arrives, it will bring changes like:

  • Oily skin and hair.
  • Facial hair growth (beard).
  • Sweat will have a stronger and more penetrating smell, especially in the area under the arms.
  • The voice becomes deeper.
  • Frequent erections, ejaculation, and wet dreams.

This process is biological and natural. It happens to all men when they grow up. The changes are presented progressively, so you must help your child change his routines to stay clean and healthy.

A routine to stay clean

Talk to your child with autism about the daily routine he needs to follow to stay clean. Teach him that he should:

  • Wear clean underwear.
  • Wash his hands daily with soap and water, especially before and after eating or after using the bathroom.
  • Use a clean, dry towel after taking a bath.
  • Take a bath twice a day.
  • Make a greater effort to clean his genitals and armpits as they are the most sweaty areas and can produce a bad smell.
  • Brush his teeth twice a day and floss to prevent tooth decay and bad breath.

What about shaving?

In adolescence, facial hair begins to show.  For children with autism, it can be uncomfortable and they may try to remove it from their faces. Your son should not shave on his own. Guide him through the whole process and tell him that he should always ask an adult for help, at least until he learns how to do it safely.

Underwear, why wear it?

We recommend that you explain to your boy why it is convenient to wear underwear. This intimate garment should be comfortable, easy for him to put on and remove, and make him feel safe when walking, running or jumping.

Mention that there are different types of underwear and he can choose the one he likes best and suits his needs.

How can he remember this much information?

At first, changing his daily routine can be hard work, but over time, your child will end up getting used to it. He will eventually understand that these new habits will help him prevent diseases, the appearance of infections, and keep him clean and fresh.

Remind him how the routine should go every day. For this, you can use these strategies:

  • Make a schedule about the times he is supposed to wash his face, shave, or take a bath.
  • Use images to remind him of the steps he needs to take every morning.
  • Put numbers on daily items, such as shampoo and deodorant, to let him know which one he should apply first.
  • Prepare special kits with the supplies he needs. For example, the first kit should have soap, a toothbrush, toothpaste, mouthwash, deodorant, and a hairbrush.
  • Choose the supplies he likes to use for their smell, texture, or pleasant sensations they produce. In stores, there are many different brands and smells. Encourage him to choose the one likes the most.
boy within the spectrum

Take care of your body is a must, check out our tips!

Source: http://bit.ly/2KRnO7C

Facebook: Autism Soccer

Instagram: Autism Soccer

Twitter: Autism Soccer

Autismsoccer.org

Major Angel Sponsor

Halloween for Children with Autism

Halloween scares many children. The themes attract their fear as there are terrifying decorations, costumes, scary movies, and not to mention an increase in the price of sweets.

The most complicated of all is to create the conditions so that this day does not affect our son/daughter with autism, and he/she can understand it in the best way. In this sense, what can we do to make this day not so chilling for them?

Remove the surprise factor

Take the time to talk with your child before Halloween. Explain to him/her in advance to prepare them for the subject. You can display images and videos with kids in disguise and with the usual “trick or treat” sign. Describe the environment and atmosphere you will find on the streets at night.

You can even show photos of previous celebrations and create a social story so that your child does not feel scared, and perceives the celebration as a repetitive event. This builds confidence and greater security.

Check out the neighborhood

Start a night walk through the neighborhood to see the decorations of the houses. Some may be more frightening than others. As a result, you may prefer to prevent your kid from visiting the most terrifying.

It is convenient to talk with the neighbors beforehand to find out what they plan to do, for example, if they plan to receive children with a costume when they get home. These scenes can cause fear in children with autism. For this reason, it is recommended to go to houses, parties, and even Halloween stores before taking your little one.

Teach trick or treat rules

Provide clear and precise instructions to your child about “trick or treat” rules. For example, don’t enter the house, say thanks and visit the next home, etc. Practice with him/her what that experience would be like and the steps you should follow, even when facing an unforeseen event such as if the neighbour is not at home.

One of the things we teach our infants is that they never accept sweets from strangers, so it is difficult to contradict this rule. It is better to explain that it is a party and that it is valid to do it this way, except you are going to shopping centers or stores.

Do a general rehearsal

Kids with sensory difficulties may experience discomfort with the clothing of Halloween. Many may suffer itching if the costume is too tight. The texture of the fabric is also likely to cause discomfort.

For children within the spectrum, makeup on the face may seem sticky. It can even make them feel weird. Besides, masks and accessories can make vision and hearing difficult, which can lead to the child feeling frustrated and forced to participate in Halloween activities.

Encourage your son/daughter to do a simulation of everything put on the costume, ask how they feel with it, and make the appropriate adjustments to make the event fun for the child.

You can also create a costume with everyday clothes. Choose a character that your child loves, but also clarify that it is not mandatory to wear a costume.

Make a candy plan

Be careful with your child’s diet. Remember that on Halloween, kids can exceed the consumption of sweets. In case of a restricted diet, deliver a bag of goodies acceptable to your neighbor beforehand so they can give it to your child.

It is also possible to exchange sweets with his/her sibling. Tell your son/daughter what he/she can and should do with sweets when he/she gets home. Set consumption limits before the party.

Promote the company of friends

Ask one of your little one’s neurotypical friends to accompany you and monitor compliance with the rules of trick or treating.

In turn, that friend can help your child with any eventuality. If you have other children, plan a solution in case your kid with ASD wants to retire before the other children have completed their activities.

Source: http://bit.ly/2kwORuX

kids enjoying Halloween

Enjoy this day to the fullest with them, following these tips.

Facebook: 786 Marketing

Instagram: @786.Marketing

Twitter: @786_Marketing

 

Major Angel Sponsor