3 Documentaries That Will Help You Better Understand Autism

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex condition, there’s a lot of things about it that people don’t know; but once they have a better understanding of what living with autism is like, they’ll realize is not a simple thing to live with. It is important to know that many of the things that are said about people with autism are not true, this way, it will be easier to sympathize and relate to them, which can have a very positive impact on the person who has the syndrome, as in the person who learns about it.

Documentaries that will help you understand autism

Sometimes, just reading about it is not enough to understand what living with ASD can mean. Luckily, documentaries can be highly educated. Here are 3 options that will give you a clearer view of the world of autism spectrum disorder.

Understanding Autism – A short documentary

On December of 2015, the humanitarian charity foundation Teebah Foundation, released this documentary to English people on what this life-long disorder is all about, as well as to shine a light on how it is to live with autism. The documentary offers an interesting perspective as it gathers information from an interview with a young girl living with ASD as her mother, who describe their own challenging experience throughout the years. It is currently available on YouTube and has more than a hundred thousand views, as it continues to inform and touch the hearts of many people all over the world, claiming that “it is non-autistic people that need to change, not the autistic ones.”

Autism In Love

One of the questions that come up when talking about people with autism is: how do they lead their romantic life? This documentary shows multiple personal experiences of adults with ASD, showing how they overcome the obstacles present when establishing a long term relationship even when their social skills are not the best. The purpose of the film is to demonstrate that having a neurobehavioral condition is not an impediment to have a romantic life the same way as any person.

Life, Animated

Based on a praised book by journalist and author Ron Suskind, this acclaimed documentary was released in 2016 by the Academy Award-winning director, Roger Ross Williams. The film tells the story of Owen Suskind, a kid who was diagnosed with autism at the age of 3. Owen’s parents were hoping that despite his condition, he would find some way to interact with the world in a meaningful way, but as time passed, they were slowly losing hope. A good day, that meaningful way came with the Walt Disney movies. That’s right, Owen battled with autism and learned how to communicate with other people through Disney films. An extremely touching story and a wonderful work to communicate what autism means for the person who has the syndrome and for their family; it results in an extraordinary documentary that is worth watching.

Understand autism

Use some art tools to make autism easier to understand.

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4 Videos That Will Make You Experience a Sensory Overload

Have you ever experienced sensory overload? Well, if you haven’t heard about it, your answer would probably be “no,” but after reading this article, you may change your perspective. The fact is that most of us have experienced sensory overload at some level at least once in our lifetime, although it is particularly associated with certain conditions like the autism spectrum disorders.

What is Sensory overload?

Sensory overload occurs when something around us stimulates at least one of our senses in an extreme way, making us feel highly uncomfortable. Have you’ve ever been to a party where the music is too high? Or a classroom where everyone is making too much noise? Sometimes in situations like those, we cannot help feeling deeply overwhelmed, the situation is just more than we can take, and we just want to get out of there and go to some place quite. That’s what sensory overload feels like.

Generally, it’s easy to escape the discomfort; if a smell is what’s bothering us we may walk away, if too many people are talking at the seam time we can use headphones or leave the room, but the fact is, when it comes about kids, especially kids with ASD, it’s not that simple to get away from these situations, because things that are part of our daily life can be the ones that make kids with ASD feel sensory overloaded.

In what situation can a sensory overload happen?

It is important to know that sensory overload triggers are not always the same for everyone, it depends on each person, but regardless, there are some common triggers when it comes to children with ASD and pretty much kids in general:

Noises

Rooms full of noises are a common factor that can trigger a sensory overload episode.It doesn’t necessarily have to be lound noises: certain people’s voices, the ringing bells of a church, the noise of the cutlery against the dishes on a restaurant, or even the unusual echo of a public bathroom can make a kid feel overwhelmed.

Bright lights

Bright lights can be more than annoying for kids; city lights or cars headlights are often usually a nuisance that depending on the sensitivity of the child, can be a strong trigger.

Unfamiliar surroundings and strangers

We should always keep in mind that sensory overload is linked with anxiety, unknown places tend to be a reason for kids with ASD to worry, also, these kids tend to feel intimidated by people that they haven’t meet before, even when they are been polite and kind.

Sometimes the things that can disturb them to the point that they feel sensory overload are not easy to perceive, therefore, we need to pay special attention to the way they react to particular surroundings and situations.

How can we help?

Talk to them: Pay attention to their usual triggers, once you’ve known them, let the kid know that you are aware of it, and you will be there to help them anytime they feel overwhelmed. For example: if you have realized that your kid doesn’t feel right on crowded places, make sure to tell him there’s no problem with going to a quiet place. Plus, the communication will create increase the bond of trust between the kid and you, and he will be more likely to try to let you know when he feels uncomfortable.

It’s important to be prepared: Kids with ASD doesn’t tend to enjoy unusual spontaneous activities, so try to avoid them every time you can, instead, make sure to have a plan and share it with the kid, that way he’ll be prepared for the upcoming event. For example, if you’re taking him to a store, let him know hours before, that way he can prepare himself for it, this way, you reduce the probability of a sensory overload episode.

It’s true that it can be hard to fully understand, and there are times where an image can say more than words, therefore, we are going to leave four links that will guide you to different videos, where each video will help you get a clearer idea of how sensory overload feels like.

Sensory Overload

 

 

Sensory Overload Simulation – What is it like to be extremely sensitive in daily situations?

 

 

Can you make it to the end?

 

Autism and sensory sensitivity

how to control sensory overload?

Sensory overload is not an easy thing for children, we have to help them to avoid hard moments and stress.

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8 Myths about Autism

The autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) is a complex neurobehavioral condition, which starts to be noticed since the first year of a kid’s life, and will last for as long as they live. The most recent data shared by the U.S. Center for Disease Control shows that 1 out of every 68 children are diagnosed with some type of autism, but even when this syndrome is more common than most people think, there’s still exist a lot of negative myths around it. Here we’re going to talk about 8 of those myth about the ASD.

True or false? Myths about autism

1) It only affects children

This is only half truth; the condition is usually diagnosed only on kids, but since it’s a lifetime condition, those kids grow up to be adults, and so, adults are affected by ASD too.

2) People with autism do not feel any kind of need for socializing with others

Not quite, although is truth that they do not have the same need that most of us have for socializing, they can enjoy time with others even when they don’t express their joy the same way we do.

3) People with autism do not feel any kind of emotion at all

This is false, it is truth that one of the most difficult things that someone with ASD can do, is to identify what they feel, but that doesn’t mean they are unable to feel any kind of feeling whatsoever, they all have Alexithymia, which is a personality construct characterized by the subclinical inability to identify and describe emotions in the self.

4) People with autism can’t express their feelings

Again, this is only half truth; they can’t express their feelings the same way we do, that is of course related to their alexithymia, meaning they can’t put in words what they feel because they don’t even know how they feel exactly. Nonetheless, they might express their feelings in particular ways, if we pay enough attention to their behavior, we should be able to find something unusual in the way they act, and so, try figure out what they feel.

5) The origin of autism is in a lack of affection

This is absolutely false, the ASD has nothing to do with lack of attention in any way, autism is just a neurobehavioral condition, a brain alteration, meaning that if you pay a lot of attention to a kid even before the autism’s syndrome can be noticed, the syndrome will still be there.

6) People with autism are geniuses

It depends on what you mean exactly. People with the syndrome shows different results when it comes about IQ, although, it is truth that a significant amount of them can show outstanding results, but it’s not something that always goes accompanied with being inside the ASD.

7) Kids with autism should not go to regular schools

Children with autism benefit greatly from integration into school life. Of course, there can be differences, but in most cases send them to school is a good thing; there they can learn about social skills, which is one of the hardest things to do for them. Although it’s truth that some kids can not face a classroom because of different reasons, and that sometimes their behavior can be harmful to other children, as noted before, this doesn’t tend to be the case.

8) They live in their own world

This is also false. A lot of times we hear those words, and though it can be just a manner of speech, it’s just not accurate; they live in the same world we all live in. Sure they can have unusual behaviors, but that doesn’t mean we should try to exclude them; the fact that they have a particular condition is not excuse for treating them as if they’re anything but people with rights and feelings. We should make things easier for them, not harder.

We hope that with this new knowledge, you have a more clear view about the autistic spectrum disorder, and remember, not everything we hear is true, sometimes the facts are a little more complicated.

are the myths about autism true or false?

Many myths about autism are completely false.

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Asperger vs. Autism: Differences

During the previous decade, Asperger disorder and autistic disorder were two separate conditions, each one of them with different treatments and therapies. But since 2013 with the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, both are included inside the denomination of autism spectrum disorders, so now it’s hard to define them as separate.

However, ASD can be diagnosed into three functional levels, putting the so-called Asperger into the first level, while the autistic disorder will depend on the symptoms and behavior of the individuals; but normally children will be between the second and third level. Nowadays, Asperger is considered as high functional autism, and for this and many other reasons, there are some differences to note between the two.

Differences between the functional levels on the spectrum

Besides the reasons stated above, when talking about differences we must understand that every individual presents a specific group of symptoms, those are the main cause for the creation of a “spectrum” that contain all the aspects related to these disorders. It will be really difficult to find two children with the same group of symptoms, even after the diagnosis. We will show the main differences among these three levels.

Language problems

On the first level, kids won’t present any kind of problems with language; actually, they can be very talkative, especially with trusted people. On the second one, they can present a certain delay in the communication skills, while on the third level we will find nonverbal children.

The first level can present some struggles like eye contact, difficulty to start a conversation and emotionless tone. But these individuals can improve these skills and have better interactions. Very different from the second and third levels, where the communication is a hard process and it can take several years of therapy to find a correct way to communicate with them.

Separate IQ levels

On the first level, we can find people with incredible talents, some of them even can present a higher IQ, which made them gifted in an array of professional fields. They can be scientists, physics, engineers or can follow an artistic line, like a classical musician. With the second level, children tend to present some struggles with the learning process, but they have an average IQ.

While for the third level, they can have an IQ below the average, which create many difficulties with the learning process and integration to professional life. They can learn basics, but it can take twice the time of the other levels.

Diagnosis

For the third level, the diagnosis is very accurate, and it can be made in the initial years. But for the first and second, it can take more time, because the symptoms and behavior are so different. Besides, as parents you must be observing every interaction and reaction of your child, to notice some strange attitude.

Teachers also play a huge role in the diagnosis, but the first level is the most difficult to give a straight diagnosis. It can take years to collect all the data about the behavior of the children, and later the respective therapy and treatment.

In the end, these denominations help to understand their struggles, conditions, and symptoms, but now they are all within the spectrum. ASD can bring new light and knowledge about autism and other disorders, to a better understanding of their lives and how they face it.

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what are Asperger and autism

These two conditions may have some similar characteristics, but it is important to know that they are not exactly the same.

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Late Spectrum Diagnosis: Just How Common it is to Be Misdiagnosed

Autism spectrum disorders nowadays can be diagnosed with more precision than ever, mostly because there’s a lot of information and tools to help with the correct diagnosis. However, in previous decades it was hard to find the reason for the atypical behavior in children and adults alike. This situation is the reason for many late diagnoses in adults, and even wrong diagnosis and treatments for the wrong condition that they had to stand while growing up.

For some individuals, dealing with struggles in their lives because they can’t choose a proper reaction and have difficulties to engage with the people around them is quite common. Finding that they are within the spectrum is a relief, as it helps them learn how to handle their conditions, that way their lives can improve significantly.

Why many children are misdiagnosed?

There is not a single cause for this. It depends on how they behave, what symptoms they present, and if their parents and teachers are paying attention to their development and interactions with other children. Also, because we are talking about a spectrum with so many different conditions and symptoms, it can be hard to place every single one of the children into it.

Since 2013, thanks to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, professionals, teachers, and parents have found a guide to place the array of symptoms associated with autism. And with it, the diagnosis has become a group effort to find the best course of action for children and help them integrate to their surroundings.

But for many kids who grow up undiagnosed and became adults, this lack of proper diagnosis became a burden; they grow with an odd feeling of not belonging, they are criticized for their natural behaviors and feel like outcasts, especially during their teenage years. With the new technology and procedures, a lot of people have been finding a correct diagnosis, starting a treatment to ease their problems, and help them interact with society.

As more people begin to understand what the ASD’s really are, there will be fewer misdiagnosis and children will find a way to develop their full potential. That is the reason why parents and teachers must work closely, ask each other if something looks out of the ordinary, be very aware of the children habits and interactions, and observe their reactions to find symptoms that will indicate some condition or behavioral aspect.

As parents, we should never be afraid to seek professional guidance and ask as many questions as are necessary; after all, your kids deserve the best in the world, and living within the spectrum is not necessarily a negative thing: it’s just the beginning of a wonderful journey with its ups and downs, with sacrifice and rewards, that will prepare them for the future ahead.

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autism spectrum condition

This condition is not something linear; it has certain variations across the people who have it.

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Instruments and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: How to Ease Child’s Lives with Music

Music helps people in many ways. For children with ASD, musical therapy is risk-free, and there are lots of activities to engage kids and adults alike in this beautiful experience. People within the spectrum find a release to their struggles with music, besides helping them interact in a different way to the world around them. And it helps them control accessory conditions, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Music therapy can bring many benefits with infants and teens with autism, improving skills like social interactions, verbal expressions, behaviors, motor skills, self-confidence, among others. And this helps handle the most common issues related to OCD when it’s part of the spectrum diagnosis.

How does the therapist work with children and teens?

The certified therapist will evaluate the individual; however, sometimes it can be a group evaluation. Knowing the patient helps to develop a plan with objectives and final goals, according to the particular needs each. They will use a wide array of musical features, considering various instruments and techniques to engage them in the activities.

One of the first steps is to improvise, let them react to the music and see their expressions: it is a good way to evaluate their behavior to different sounds, instruments, and songs. Many specialists prefer using percussion instruments or even singing to children expecting different reactions and categorizing them. That allows them to have a starting point when it comes to therapy.

After the kids are used to the sounds, she or he can change the style and apply new techniques to incentivize the participation. This therapy is well known because it is not conventional, using only sound, dances, and instruments it can generate a reaction that will increase the patient’s confidence, teamwork, and communication skills. But, how does this pair up with children suffering from OCD-like behavior? Let’s break it down here.

Benefits of the music therapy

Social interactions

Music therapy can engage the little ones to work and enjoy around others, because usually, music creates a reaction, helping them share the experience with their peers. Therapists agree that they answer more willingly to the different activities if these are paired with a prefer instrument or music genre.

Use the singing to communicate will start a new way of communication that can translate outside the therapist’s room, even without music. For others, it is an excellent way to share a common ground and share experiences and tastes. In other words, music will unite kids and teens within the spectrum without the strange and uncomfortable aspects of social interactions. And this is fundamental for individuals that have OCD as an accessory condition. As many spectrum therapies involve structure, they could try to pair that up with their social skills. Giving them a tool to handle social interactions will ease them into connecting with others, making it easier for them to bypass some of the difficulties that arise in socialization if you have OCD.

Behaviors

Many people within the spectrum can show different behaviors, and these can be hard to face for parents and family, but music therapy has been proved an excellent way to control them. Besides music and sounds are a great way to prepare he or she to noisy environments and spaces. After one-hour session, they tend to be relaxed and feel at ease with the ones around them.

This is fundamental for obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, as they tend to stick into repetitive patterns that don’t allow them to interact freely with others. Music, as an evolutive therapy, can change that, helping them understand that they don’t need to stick to strict routines to interact with others.

Anxiety

Kids within the spectrum are propense to feel anxious many times during the day, but music is a fantastic way to make them feel calm with a different stimulus. Many parents noted their children relaxed by simple listen to their favorite song or music, or even just with one hour of therapy. Remember that the treatment can be taken to the house, music is good for everybody at home!

For OCD patients, anxiety over their routines being disrupted is a problem. That’s why having instruments at home it’s perfect, as it’s a way to have an outlet to frustration, anxiety and other negative emotions. It allows them to occupy their minds and bodies in something other than the stressing element, helping them to relax more easily.

Have fun

This therapy can bring happiness, because of all the benefits stated above, there will have a calm reaction to the music, and even they will feel happy to listen to it. For some cases is playing their favorite instruments that will put them at ease, and that is the best part of the therapy, parents can continue it at home and every day can turn into something more manageable!

Remember, music is an effective way to reach a new aspect of their personality, and help them with their different conditions. Therapy will always be good for them, but music therapy is another level to help them to improve their skill while having fun with the new experience.

Come to Autism Soccer, where we offer excellent programs for the development of your kids and a place for them to be comfortable and happy. All this with the help of experts that can guide them!

small children behaviors

Your children can learn to use music to calm themselves, playing an instrument helps them change their obsessive behaviors.

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Why do People Say “Autism Spectrum”?

Autism is a condition that still has many unanswered questions, but nowadays the medical term when it comes to it is “autism spectrum disorders.” This term appeared because the many symptoms and behaviors associated with people diagnosed with autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder.

Why the use of “spectrum”?

The symptoms and behaviors can develop at different pace and ages; however, there are some similarities among them. For that reason in 2013, with the publication of the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, all these disorders and conditions were put in one term, “autism spectrum disorders,” divided into three levels of diagnosis.

Inside the spectrum, people can be as different as their symptoms. We can find individuals that are highly intelligent and independent but have problems with social interactions, others that need therapy to be able to exchange even just a few words with strangers, and some that will always need assistance with daily routines.

People within the spectrum will always have problems with social interaction, making it a common symptom among them. But others symptoms and conditions can vary from person to person, hence the need to put them within a spectrum; that way we can identify them inside the condition and allowing them to be treated according to their unique attributes and requirements, without branding them in a specific condition or disorder.

For professionals in the area, a correct diagnosis on a child can take several years. This is because children can develop symptoms while growing up, hence the need to follow a constant observation of their behavior. But being within the spectrum opens an array of options: kids will have lives full of challenges to conquer that will need to be faced in very specific ways, with strategies according to their needs.

Now you have it! Being in the ASD means that every person diagnosed within it will face their own problems, but at the same time, it will be rewarded with the knowledge that they aren’t alone, that there are many with at least one symptom similar to them.

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autism spectrum condition

This condition is not something linear; it has certain variations across the people who have it.

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What About Eye Contact in Children with Autism?

One of the most known characteristics of the autism spectrum disorder is lack of eye contact, which presents in the first years of the life of these children, with some professionals suggesting that it can start on the first months. This lack of social interaction is not by any means a sign or rudeness from them, but actually, it’s a way to feel more comfortable among people. Children with ASD can get highly anxious with eye contact, especially if the other person responds to it.

Symptoms

As every characteristic within the spectrum, avoiding eye contact can manifest in multiple ways:

  • Some actively seem to avoid eye contact because they feel uncomfortable with it, as with every social interaction.
  • Others can make eye contact in familiar environments, with well-known people.
  • And others can look at you in strange ways, staring either at you or at a specific object.

Why does this happen?

There are two major reasons that explain why children and adults alike avoid this action. First, they feel indifference toward eye contact; they think that it isn’t important to establish it. Remember, they often don’t have the same instincts about social interactions as neurotypical people, so they cannot fully comprehend why it is necessary to make direct contact. This normally happens during childhood.

However, when they grow up, teenagers and adults with ASD feel eye contact in an uncomfortable way that can trigger anxiety episodes and other adverse reactions or behaviors. Some completely hate it, especially if they are pushed to do it, so never pressure them; instead, you should encourage them to improve their social abilities but never to the point of generating the opposite reaction. Professionals haven’t found the reason behind this change from children to teenagers because children can learn how to make eye contact without rejecting it, but while growing up, they feel it as a burden.

There are still many questions about this, and many ongoing studies exploring possible reasons; but meanwhile, working with these kids to develop their social skills is the best way to change these behaviors, with patience and hard work.

Can lack of eye contact be treated?

With the autism spectrum disorder, there are usually more questions than answers, and that leaving aside the controversy in many studies and therapies. In that regard, eye contact is no the exception; however, therapists now believe that there’s no symptomatic answer, instead, it can depend on every individual and the way they feel towards it. Instead of trying to fix this, we as educators, parents, and facilitators should listen to their own voice in that regard, accept that they don’t like it, and teach them to communicate it by simply saying something like “I’m listening but i won’t look at you directly.” The most important thing we have to do is understand that this preference is totally fine, that making eye contact isn’t essential for communication and that we must accept this preference, instead of trying to force a change.

Remember eye contact isn’t the most important skill when dealing with a person with autism; if they are more comfortable without looking at you, but are still listening and can have a satisfying conversation with you on many different topics, then that’s all that should matter. Come to Autism Soccer, where we offer excellent programs for the development of your children and a place for them to be comfortable and happy.

Why eye contact is a problem for some people with ASD

Eye contact, which is close nonverbal communication, may generate anxiety in people within the spectrum.

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Tips to Develop the Children’s Occupational Performance in School

Teaching is a hard work, but teaching several children in a classroom can be quite a challenge. If those kids are diagnosed within the autism spectrum disorder, the teaching process becomes an even greater challenge. However, a classroom adapted to them and their needs can increase their attention, focus, reduce stress, and in general aid the learning process..

It’s not just adapting your teaching process; even the decoration of the classroom in a way that will make them to consider it a safe place can make a difference in the proper development of their skills, and could even help encourage them to try new things, even when they’re reluctant to try new stuff.

There are many things that can trigger a bad episode in children in the spectrum, and these episodes make them to lose concentration and make the learning process slower overall, so take in consideration the following points, so you can avoid these episode and optimize the learning experience.

Work space

Many kids with autism feel better with a special place to work, and it doesn’t have to be a specifically designed table or chair for them; just a couple of accessories can make the difference. Things like: an air cushion for the chair, a theraband for kicking, or a training ball, among others, can help the kids to release their anxiety. It’s also advisable to rotate your students around the classroom seats, particularly in places where they could feel more anxious, such as corners, near windows, or close to the door. This can both reduce their stress, and help them get used to small changes. You can also be mindful of the classroom’s decoration, making it personalized, so the kids can feel more at home and comfortable, but not too overwhelming with colors and figures, as to be a source of distraction.

Be active

Kids with autism get bored easily, so play with them between subject lessons. This playtime not necessarily has to be a game, it can be some yoga movements to relax their bodies, or play some music and dance; just be creative and make them move to release tension. Find an activity that they enjoy while moving and make it at least a weekly routine.

Fidgets

In the last few years a little toy called fidget spinner became very famous among neurotypical children. However, these toys were created for kids with autism and ADHD to help them concentrate and pay attention in lessons. You can find this sort of fidget or similar ones to make them do a repetitive action while teaching your lessons, hence enhancing their focus.

Sensory calm space

The day can be long for a kid with ASD, and for that reason it is good to have a space, even if it is just a corner, where kids can shut off everything outside of it. Make a tent, a teepee, a big box, or just use a pair of blankets to set that corner apart of the rest; the main point here is to give them the sensation of protection, that nothing can reach them there and hurt them. Remember, children within the spectrum can become stressed very easily, due to sensory overload. Teach them how to use this space to deal with their stress and encourage parents to do the same at home.

Plan ahead of time

Routines are basic for children with ASD. It doesn’t matter the level, they develop better with plans. If they know in advance what is going to happen the following week, they can be prepare and get ready for what could otherwise be unexpected and uncomfortable situations. However use this with care and only tell them what is coming ahead every week, because if a child within  the spectrum knows, for example, all the month’s schedule in advance, then their anxiety can become even bigger, affecting their behavior at home and maybe even their eating and sleeping patterns. .

Make the learning process fun

In the end, kids with ASD are just kids, and because of that learning with fun activities can help to be more in sync with the schedule and school duties. Kids can get to enjoy the classroom and the lessons if they feel like they’re playing a game. So it’s up to you, as their teacher, to be creative and make the lessons fun for them, and of course, for you.

Teaching kids with autism is a wonderful experience that can change your life as teacher for the best, so don’t be afraid, have fun teaching these children, and try to leave you mark on them. A teacher that is good with their students will be one that they never forget. Come to Autism Soccer, where we offer excellent programs for the development of your children and a place for them to be comfortable and happy.

What a child with ASD needs to do in school

There are many activities that you can apply in your classroom, all according to the sensory needs of each child.

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10 Q&A about Autism

Autism spectrum disorder is a developmental disorder that can affect several skills in a person, especially language, motor, and social skills. It’s classified in three levels for diagnosis; however, many people still don’t fully comprehend it completely, and the different aspects that are associated with it. With these ten questions and answers, we hope to expand your knowledge about it.

What are the causes of autism?

This is the most common question about the disorders in the spectrum, but scientists and medical professionals haven’t found a specific cause or causes. There are many studies about the possible reasons, but the results haven’t been conclusive; some think that a genetic mutation is the main cause; others point to differences in the development of the brain in during the pregnancy, which would cause the behavioral conditions associated with it. Still, this question doesn’t have a specific answer.

Is it common?

Yes, it is. Autism is the most common developmental disorder, 1 in 150 children can be diagnosed within one of the three levels of the spectrum.

Who can suffer autism?

Anyone. ASD doesn’t distinguish among social status or ethnicity. However, gender seems to be a factor, as it has been proven that 4 out of 5 people within the spectrum are male.

How does autism influence behavior?

It depends on the level, but the primary challenge among people with ASD is social interaction. People with autism tend not to be able to grasp all the aspects of human communication fully, so subtle details can be tough for them. Besides, people placed in level 3 tend to have erratic and compulsive behavior; which is why they’ll always need a caregiver.

How severe is the behavior of a person with autism?

This can be subjective; it will depend on the level in which that person is placed, with the third level being the most severe. However, behavior can be controlled with a correct diagnosis during the early years and with the proper treatment; children with autism can be calm and behave normally. The real problem here is that parents struggle to accept their kid’s condition, and it can take years for them to start the correct treatments.

Can they manage to be independent?

Again, this will depend on the level of ASD, but many of them can manage to have an independent life when they reach adulthood, just by following the right treatment and having the correct guidance.

Is autism a cognitive disability?

No, both terms are not synonyms. ASD is a developmental disorder, while cognitive disabilities affect learning and motor skills; some children within the spectrum can show display these disabilities, but not necessarily all of them. As noted before, the more significant challenges are social interaction and personal relationships.

Can autism appear with other conditions?

Yes, there are other disorders associated with developmental skills that are present with ASD. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), learning disabilities, bipolarity, and epilepsy can all appear in kids with autism, sometimes in combinations. It’s for this reason that doctors recommend for parents to be very observant of their children’s behavior during the early years so that these problems can be adequately identified and treated.

Can people with autism work?

Yes, with the correct therapy people within the spectrum can work in many different areas, as a matter of fact, people diagnosed with the first level of ASD can become very successful on their fields; some of them can even have above average intelligence.

What type of work can a person with autism perform?

Because of their compulsive and repetitive behavior, structured jobs tend to be the best for them. They develop better with routines and repetitive activities; however, many prefer the type of job where they don’t have to interact with the public, or with large amounts of people. Keep in mind that individuals within the spectrum tend to struggle with social interactions.

As you can see, autism is no longer a disorder that few people know, it has become a thoroughly studied condition; in this era of inclusion, we as a society are trying to give people with ASD the space that they need, and to understand them the best way we could. Come to Autism Soccer, where we offer excellent programs for the development of your children and a place for them to be comfortable and happy.

Autism Soccer answer your questions regarding autism

On today’s article, we answer all your questions.

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