Is It Regular for People With Autism to Be Introverts?

With autism or not, a large number of people are introverted. Some with this condition may seem like they don’t want to interact with people they see or talk to regularly, but this isn’t always the case.

In this article, we’ll talk about the apparent connection between autism and introversion. Keep reading!

Does having autism also mean being introverted?

Since people with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) have different communication barriers, talking or interacting with others can be a strenuous endeavor for them. So socializing tends to be a difficult task, but it doesn’t necessarily mean they can’t enjoy it.

People with autism are more likely than not to be introverted, and some may find it challenging to open up to people around them. However, this doesn’t always mean they don’t want others around and prefer to spend all their time alone. Many enjoy being around their loved ones and make new friends.

Although some introverted people may present ASD, these two aspects don’t relate to each other directly.

Everybody has their peculiarities and, often, these can be confused with being introverted. For example, many people avoid some types of contact and social events or prefer to be by themselves sometimes, but they still like to share what they feel and think with others. Most of them even enjoy participating in different social activities. So this is a common misconception of people with autism.

Then, why is introversion associated with autism?

In an article published by the portal Verywell Health, Lisa Jo Rudy answers this question by explaining that:

Autism is a developmental disorder that is defined by difficulties with social communication. Those difficulties can range from the subtle to the extreme. People with high functioning autism may find it hard to maintain eye contact or distinguish friendly teasing from bullying, while people with severe autism may be completely unable to use spoken language. Expressive and receptive speech, eye contact, body language, and a command of the nuances of vocal tone are all critically important tools for social communication.

“Because social communication is so challenging for people with autism, most are not very good at it and many find it both frustrating and exhausting. That doesn’t necessarily mean that they don’t want to engage with others—but the process is neither simple nor natural,” clarifies the author.

So neither being introverted means you have autism nor ASD makes you an introvert. Introversion can be a regular trait in any person.

Source: https://www.verywellhealth.com/are-autistic-people-introverts-4691154

Being an introvert is a trait many people have, but is it more common in children with autism?

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