First-Time Parents Guide: My Son Has Autism, What Can I Do?

If you have a child who has been diagnosed with autism, you probably feel worried, which is only natural. The concern may arise from the knowledge of the condition as by the lack of knowledge of it, after all, autism is a pretty complex disorder capable of causing different kinds of complications in a child’s development, as well as in their understanding of the world. So, when a child is diagnosed, we must provide the necessary support so that this child can grow and have a great future; after everything, that is what every father wants for his son.
Do you have a child with autism? Here is some advice for you:

Do not panic

If you’re extremely worried prematurely, this won’t do you any help. Your child might need more support than other kids, but that doesn’t have to be a bad thing: a child with autism can perfectly live a normal life just like any other kid, plus, there have been several people with autism who have become important historical figures. Do not over-worry; things may not be as bad as you might think when the diagnosis is made.

Inform yourself

First of all: the more knowledge, the better. ASD (autistic spectrum disorder) manifests in several different ways in the kids, your child is probably very different from other kids with autism; therefore, the comparison can be virtually irrelevant. So instead of comparing, search for information, there are many websites dedicated to sharing data about autism and all it represents (just like this one). Also, it’s highly recommendable to constantly work alongside a specialist on the matter, together you will create strategies to help your child overcome every obstacle on his way.

Consider professional help

As mentioned before, working alongside an expert on the field can be extremely helpful, so this is definitely one very recommended step to follow. Autism kids tend to have particular behaviors that require particular treatments; some of them might need just a bit of professional assistance, while others require long term therapy, in any case, the professional help is always handy, so it’s something to keep in mind.

Be mentally prepared

Kids with ASD are quite different from other kids, they may react to common situations in unexpected ways, not pay attention to things most kids do pay attention to, or behave in unusual ways. This tends to happen because their way of seeing the world is different than ours, but this does not have to be a reason to worry parse, it just means your child is different (which is not a bad thing). Nonetheless, you should be conscious that your child behavior may surprise you more than once. Keep an open mind at all times.

Love!

False rumors will always be around: “Kids with autism do not feel any emotions,” “Children with autism never express their feelings,” “They live in their own world.” We should not pay attention to this kind of comments, a child with autism has feelings just like any other kids. Even when they do not show them in usual ways, they need love and support and, as parents, is crucial to be there for our child no matter what.

It’s true that raising a child with ASD can be complicated but, at the end of the day, it’s all worth it. Before you realize, they will be making you feel proud.

first son with autism

If your first son was born with some type of autism, you don’t have any reason to care. Help him!

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How is Defined ASD in the DSM-5

The DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as its name says, is a diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, edited by the American Psychiatric Association (APA). The purpose of this manual is to classify mental disorders as well as provide clear descriptions of the different categories in which these are, so it can be useful for different clinicians and researchers in the health sciences fields. The latest edition is the DSM-5, and what its intended with its implication is that it becomes more dynamic when it comes to incorporating new scientific discoveries. This is very useful when it comes to making a medical diagnosis, studying one of the different disorders in it or sharing information to treat them.

The autistic spectrum disorder in the DSM-5

First of all, it is necessary to point out that the previous version of the DSM defined autism and its associated disorders as “pervasive developmental disorders” (PDD), while in the recent version (DSM-5) the term definition has been substituted for “autism spectrum disorder” (ASD), and has been included in the neurodevelopmental disorders category.

This said, below you’ll find detail information about the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder, provide by the American Psychiatric Association:

A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, as manifested by the following, currently or by history.
1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, ranging, for example, from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back-and-forth conversation; to reduced sharing of interests, emotions, or affect; to failure to initiate or respond to social interactions.
2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, ranging, for example, from poorly integrated verbal and nonverbal communication; to abnormalities in eye contact and body language or deficits in understanding and use of gestures; to a total lack of facial expressions and nonverbal communication.
3. Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships, ranging, for example, from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit various social contexts; to difficulties in sharing imaginative play or in making friends; to the absence of interest in peers.

B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by at least two of the following, currently or by history.
1. Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech (e.g., simple motor stereotypies, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia, idiosyncratic phrases).
2. Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, ritualized patterns or verbal-nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals, need to take the same route or eat food every day).
3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus (e.g, strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interest).
4. Hyper or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interests in sensory aspects of the environment (e.g., apparent indifference to pain/temperature, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).

C. Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities, or may be masked by learned strategies in later life).

D. Symptoms cause clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of current functioning.

E. These disturbances are not better explained by intellectual disability (intellectual developmental disorder) or global developmental delay. Intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder frequently co-occur; to make comorbid diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, social communication should be below that expected for general developmental level.

NOTE: individuals with a well-established DSM-IV diagnosis of autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified should be given the diagnosis of ASD. Individuals who have marked deficits in social communication, but whose symptoms do not otherwise meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder, should be evaluated for social (pragmatic) communication disorder.

The DSM-5 has also included a table that shows different severity levels for autism spectrum disorder as well as the help required for each level, these are:

Level 1: “Requiring support.”
Level 2: “Requiring substantial support.”
Level 3: “Requiring very substantial support.”

Autism is a complex neurobehavioral condition, therefore, is understandable that information about this condition is constantly being updated, but what’s really important about these updates, is that with each one we learn how to help people with autism in better ways, so it’s essential to keep up with the DSM information about ASD.

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How to Teach a Child With Autism

Autistic spectrum disorder, a complex neurobehavioral lifetime condition, it’s easy to notice that kids with this condition are quite different: they pay attention to unusual stuff, seem more interested on particular things, show different reactions to common events or behave in particular ways; the difference they have compare to most of the kids are pretty noticeable, therefore, their way to learn its different too. For this reason, it is necessary to find the best way to teach a child within the spectrum.

Teaching a child with ASD

If you have a child with autism and you want to know the right way to teach him or her, you’re in the right place; we’re going to give you a few advices to make that possible.

1) Be mentally prepared

The first thing you should do is prepare mentally, you have to be conscious it won’t be like teaching other kids, it might be harder, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible, not at all, it just means it will be necessary to apply different teaching strategies depending on the kid behavior.

2) Pay attention to details

Depending on the autism level, the child will not always verbally express their doubts, nevertheless, they tend to make particular gestures that can make us realize whether they understand what we’re teaching or not. Children within the spectrum don’t have only a way to behave, therefore, you need to be patient and pay attention to the kid behavior to find a way to understand what is happening in his head.

3) Apply visual strategies

For a child with autism, understanding what other people verbally say can be complicated; for this reason, we should try to use as many images as possible. Visual aid is usually more useful than verbal. Pictures, drawings, symbols, photographs, all of these are elements that can considerably effective on kids with ASD. It is worth mention that this doesn’t mean teaching only through words is not effective, but is undoubtedly better to support words with images.

4) Don’t be afraid to use tech

Technology alternatives can be used to facilitate learning. It is easier and less tedious for a boy or girl to press buttons and touchscreens than to write with a pencil on a piece of paper; and, since we seek to make teaching as effective as possible, it is important to consider this method. Plus, in today’s world, there are many pc programs or apps that are centered on helping them to develop different abilities; so without a doubt, those are worth to take a look at.

5) Keep them motivated

They can show a lot of disinterest in learning new tasks; for this reason, it is important to make teaching as dynamic as possible. Congratulate them every time they do something well; smile constantly; show a positive attitude at all times and if the lesson allow it, carry out some kind of learning game. The more dynamic the sessions, the more motivated they will be, therefore, the faster they’ll learn.

6) One step at a time

Patience is important. Is essential not to overload the child with complicated steps to follow; on the contrary, you must teach one thing at a time, Is truth that the learning will be slower, but at the end of the day, it will also be more effective, and that’s what’s really important. Kids with autism can be really interesting people, even though on simple sight they might seem less capable, there is no doubt they can reach incredible goals, but all of that starts with the teaching.


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Does your favorite artist live with autism?

ASD (autistic spectrum disorder) is a complex neurobehavioral condition; in some people, it is noticeable, while in others, it is present in such a way that it can go unnoticed. Many artists today have been diagnosed with autism at some point of their lives, some of them are very important figures (perhaps even one of your favorite artists has this condition, and you have not realized it). Here we bring you some artists who have lived with autism.

Artists who have lived with autism

Michael Jackson

The King of Pop, Michael Jackson, was one of the most influential people that ever existed. Singer, composer, record producer, dancer, actor, and philanthropist, MJ was simply a musical genius, but what a lot of people doesn’t know is that he might have had Asperger syndrome; though is not confirmed, certainly the traits in his personality -like being withdrawn, shy, and very sensitive- seem to point that way.

Courtney Love

The charismatic Courtney Love is known for being a singer-songwriter, guitarist, and actress; according to her Wikipedia biography, at age nine, a psychologist noted that she exhibited signs of autism, something that never stopped her from doing what she loves. In the 90s, she attracted a lot of media attention consistently for its impetuous and frank personality, and though she was a controversial character, as an artist and fashion icon she was always respected.

View this post on Instagram

#tbt 1996. Meisel.

A post shared by Courtney Love Cobain (@courtneylove) on

Woody Allen

Woody Allen is a very respected figure. With a highly successful career on his back, the actor, screenwriter, writer, playwright, film director, and comedian -who is also a four times Academy Award winner- is already an icon, and though it has never been explicitly said that he is on the autism spectrum, different experts seem to agree that that’s likely the case.

Woody Allen – Photo By Merrick Morton, © 2012 Gravier Productions, Inc.

Posted by Woody Allen on Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Tim Burton

It may not be publicly confirmed that Tim Burton has ASD, but he has acknowledged that Edward Scissorhands, one of his most famous films, has a lot of autobiography due that it describes the isolation he suffered when he was a child; in addition, his ex-wife Helena Bonham Carter, said that she noticed signs of autism in the artist. In any case, Tim Burton is a director, producer, writer, and American cartoonist very loved by his fans and the media. The vast majority of Burton’s works have a very marked style that differentiates them from other movies, classics such as The Nightmare Before Christmas and Big Fish are already cult films.

An elephant will fly! Photo by Leah Gallo Photography LtdPRODUCTION UNDERWAY FOR TIM BURTON’S “DUMBO”Live-Action…

Posted by Tim Burton – Official Page on Saturday, July 29, 2017

Bill Gates

Bill Gates may not be an artist exactly, but his achievements are so incredibly remarkable that it’s worth mentioning him. Is common known that Gates has always been a meticulous and methodical person, he tends to show continuous equilibrium movement when he’s concentrated; plus, he has a monotonous way of speaking and is not unusual for him to avoid eye contact. Despite all of that, he’s one of the most important figures of our time: the Microsoft co-founder is one of the richest men alive.

autism and artist

Autism is in everywhere, no matter what’s your profession.

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Walk

Autism Soccer Walk Register. Recruit. Results

Event details

Join us Saturday April 6 th , 2019 to celebrate Autism Soccer Awareness Week in the
State of Florida and National Autism Awareness Month.
We invite everyone to come as we take this excellent opportunity to promote sports
inclusion and autism awareness.

Thank you ALL for your support and we will see you there, and remember to PLAY
FOR MORE
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DATE

Saturday, April 6th, 2019

SCHEDULE

8:30 AM Registration – Check-in Open
10:00 AM Walk opening ceremonies and Stage program
10:30 Walk begins (1.5 mile loop, begins and ends)

LOCATION
AMELIA EARHART PARK

401 E 65th St, Hialeah, FL 33013

CONTACT

Oscar Amuz
+ 1-305-469-0895
Info@AutismSoccer.org

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ENROLL

Is to teach children in the autism spectrum disorder and other abilities soccer
skills in a supportive environment, develop a life-long love for exercise, while
having FUN! Through Autism Soccer (AS), children learn that with training, confidence and love anything is possible.

We have been working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorders for the past 6 years. Amused by the results on the behavior and development of the kids on the spectrum who practice the sport of soccer we decided to take a step further and create not only a weekly class program also a foundation who’s mission is create and promote inclusion on sports for the kids on the spectrum.

Letter from the Founder

Autism Spectrum Disorder awareness is not just a month a year, it’s such an important cause it should be a constant reminder every day of the year, but on April 6, 2019 in Miami, Fl we will heard!

We need reforms and changes in our society to help include these kids as part of our everyday lives and give them an oportunity to be part of the sports as well; Help our children to be heard and came to walk with us!

Autism Soccer is constantly working on the kids inclusion specially on sports programs, through different projects and pilot iniciatives, it’s something that needs to be done and can not be ignore anymore.

Inclusion for autistic kids in sports has to be a human right as citizens of the world. Sports organizations and clubs have to start to give them a place an adapt to a society with Autism.

All is needed it is love, patience and compassion to create room for those whose abilities might be a little diferent than ours.

Join our campaign, on April 6, 2019 Miami Fl. Let’s walk for our future of sports inclusion! Walk with Autism Soccer for inclusion on sports for autistic kids. Your contribution will make a difference, feel free to volunteer with us, contact us!

Thank you very much

firma_oscar

Oscar Amuz
Founder
Autism Soccer
www.AutismSoccer.org
Amuz@autismsoccer.org
+1-305-469-0895

Voices of Autism Soccer Walk

Mr. Carlos Valderrama “El Pibe” & Mss. Elvira Redondo

About the Autism Soccer Walk

The success of Autism Soccer Walk depends on the dedication and support of its volunteers.

Volunteers can assist in many different ways, please contact us for more information: Info@autismsoccer.org, 305-469-0895

Some of the tasks are: Handing water to participants, Security aids, registration, event organization , and much more.

Feel free to create volunteer teams at work or with your family and friends we will assign a task that fits your group and try our best to keep you together. Please register online.

Volunteer as Individual! There are many ways can you are helpful to our walk the list of task will be assign the day of the event but your contribution will make a great impact on our success.

If you decide to become a volunteer the day of the walk go to our registration table and someone will guide you and take you with the person in charge.

The autism soccer committee is crucial for the success of our walk. These are individuals who volunteer before our walk and work on the  success of our event program.

The most important roles of the committee are not limited to media outreach, corporate sponsorship, community outreach and much more.

If you interested in participating or will like to become and be part of our committee please contact us at info@autismsoccer.org

What is SCORE A GOAL program?

The SCORE A GOAL recognizes fundraisers for Autism Soccer Walk who raises at least $500 or more prior to or at Walk day.

Members receive special benefits that may include:

  • Names listed on Autism Soccer Walk website
  • Special recognition at Autism Soccer Walk and Awards Reception
  • And many more benefits!
  • Add your name to the list!

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